The Team

Dr Jeffrey I RoseDr Jeffrey I Rose

Dr Jeffrey I Rose is a Research Fellow at the Institute of Archaeology and Antiquity, University of Birmingham. His areas of interest include prehistoric archaeology of the Arabian Peninsula, modern human origins, stone tool technology, human genetics, rock art, geoarchaeology, underwater archaeology, and geomythology. He holds a BA in Classics, a MA in Archaeology from Boston University, and a MA and PhD in Anthropology from Southern Methodist University.

Over the past twenty years, Jeff has conducted archaeological fieldwork in North America, Wales, Ukraine, Israel, Portugal, Yemen, the United Arab Emirates, and Oman. Since 2000, he has directed an ongoing archaeological survey and excavation project in southern Arabia. The project was recently featured on the BBC documentary series Incredible Human Journey.

Jeff currently resides in Muscat, Oman where he runs the Dhofar Archaeological Project and field school all well as being engaged in various initiatives to raise public awareness of the importance of archaeological heritage throughout the Sultanate of Oman.

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Kathryn PriceKathryn Price

Kathryn Price took her BSC (Hons) degree in archaeology at the University of Wales, Cardiff and her postgraduate degree in Human Origins and Palaeolithic Archaeology at the University of Southampton. She has spent eight years working within British archaeology in a variety of roles including field staff, Finds and Archives Officer as well as on research projects in Qatar, Oman, UAE, India, South Africa and France. Her research interests include the Pleistocene and Early Holocene of the Arabian Peninsula, the Gulf region and South West Asia, with a particular emphasis on lithic technologies and their application for the analysis of human origins, dispersals, sociality and interaction.

Kathryn in currently a Research Technician at the University of Birmingham based in Qatar working for The Qatar National Historic Environmental Record (QHNER) project. Kathryn is the lithic specialist for the project, manages the post-excavation laboratory and is also an excavation supervisor.

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Mike MorleyMike Morley

Mike Morley is a Geoarchaeologist with 15 years experience of working in both academic and commercial environments. His primary area of expertise is the study of cave and rockshelter sediments as archives of environmental change, but he has also worked extensively on alluvial sequences and floodplain archaeology, coastal and shallow marine sediments, and palaeosol-colluvium successions.

Mike’s research focuses on human-environment interactions and the decoupling of natural from anthropogenic palaeoenvironmental signals. He believes that the key to sound geoarchaeological research lies in allying high quality, systematic fieldwork with scientifically-robust, multi-proxy analytical techniques. This approach achieves the best results when generating high-resolution palaeoenvironmental data. Mike has worked on fieldwork campaigns in Europe (Spain, Italy and the Western Balkans), North Africa (Libya), southern Africa (Lesotho), the Middle East (Oman, Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates) and Southeast Asia (Malaysian Borneo and Vietnam).

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Anthony MarksAnthony Marks

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Ash PartonAsh Parton

A hard working, scientifically minded individual with a proven record of successfully designed and executed practical and academic research and lecturing. A well-established employment history has resulted in excellent time and resource management skills, which alongside a series of successful fieldwork expeditions and professional research collaborations, has produced the ability to work successfully within a team.

My current research involves developing a detailed framework of climatic and environmental change within south-east Arabia over the past 200,000 years. Arabia is critically located with respect to the dispersal and development of early human communities, whilst it’s position at the interface of the world’s most dynamic atmospheric systems (the Indian Ocean Monsoon and the Mid-Latitude Westerlies), means that the region is also particularly sensitive to global climate change. Throughout time, the climatic and landscape changes within Arabia have been both many and massive and the effects of such change resonate throughout the archaeological record, shaping the fortunes of early hunter-gatherer communities and great civilisations alike. The development of a high-resolution record of environmental change within the region is therefore essential in assessing the effects of climate change on early human communities, whilst also providing vital information regarding the nature and future of global climate change and the dynamics of the global atmospheric system.

Through a number of successful research collaborations, I have identified, excavated and analysed a variety of sites in order to develop a framework of regional climate change. The application of a multi-proxy approach when analysing these sites has provided me with an excellent knowledge of climate change indicators, and I am therefore experienced in the retrieval, preparation and analysis of samples for sedimentological (bulk physical), geochemical (bulk and fractionated elemental), isotope (carbonate and organic), magnetic susceptibility and ostracod analysis, along with AMS radiocarbon and Optically Stimulated Luminescence (OSL) dating techniques.

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Christopher GallettiChristopher Galletti

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Jean Marie GeilingJean Marie Geiling

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Richard RobertsRichard Roberts

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Amir BeshkaniAmir Beshkani

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Vitaly UsikVitaly Usik

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Yamandú HilbertYamandú Hilbert

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